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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 45
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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the very issues which the u.k. yb are discussing in the combat. we know schools across the country are tuning in to watch and that is hugely welcome. just on process and housekeeping, let me say the following. first, nyp who wish to speak should stand in their place, or raise their hands if seated in a wheelchair. secondly, and most importantly, nyp should always say their name and region at the beginning of their speech. otherwise -- the official record of our proceedings will be deficient. the writers will not know who you are unless you say. if you be good enough to pause, momentarily, before you start your speech, that will give an opportunity for the microphone to be activated. your gain here -- you're going to hear from the leader of the house and the leader, whom is my delight to welcome here today. leader of the house andrew, and angela. and the parliament tear undersecretary of state at the department of education, the children's minister edward. edward, andrew, angela, it's a delight to have you. before we hear from andrew and angela, i call in order to read a message fro
-span. on wednesday the british chancellor, the u.k.'s head of treasury released the annual report on the british economy. prime minister david cameron took questions on proposed cuts that he says will help the deficit on the u.k. he also answers questions on afghanistan, securing the border, and youth unemployment. this is just over 30 minutes. >> number one, mr. speaker. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm sure the whole house will wish to join me in graduating the duke and duchess of cam brage on the wonderful knew they are expecting their first child. turning to my friend's question on afghanistan. the threat to global security from al qaeda has been significantly reduced and this is in large part of the brave work of u.k. and afghan armed forces. we remain committed to afghanistan for the long-term and we continue to support the development of afghan forces through continued funds and training. our crrt that aid to help the state to police its own lands. it is this part that al qaeda won't will able to re-establish itself in afghanistan. >> the taliban is being told when most of our troops are le
answered questions on afghanistan, secure in the u.k. border. this is just over 30 minutes. >> number one, mr. speaker. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm sure the whole house will wish to join me in graduating the duke and duchess of cambridge on the wonderful knew they are expecting their first child. turning to my friend's question on afghanistan. the threat to global security from al qaeda has been significantly reduced and this is in large part of the brave work of u.k. and afghan armed forces. we remain committed to afghanistan for the long-term and we continue to support the development of afghan forces through continued funds and training. our contribution that aid to help the state to police its own lands. it is this part that al qaeda won't will able to re-establish itself in afghanistan. >> the taliban is being told when most of our troops are leaving and they need to be told when sanctions to expect if they help al qaeda to return. what would those sanctions be and would an allied strategic base serve to make them credible? >> i think the most important sanction for everyone to be
about the contrast between the u.k. and the united states which i think is revealing, and some world's about -- words about challenges facing the world economy which is more important than those facing individual countries alone. the united kingdom was hit very badly by the financial crisis. total gdp fell by 6% between the peak at the beginning of 2008 and the trough in the second quarter of 2009. output still remains 3% below the peak level. and more than 15% below levels that output would have reached have the long run average growth rate merely continued. on top of that, the inflation rate has been a 2% target. and in the wake of the financial crisis, the budget deficit reached a level of 11% of gdp, a good part of that being structural. we have serious problems to contend with when trying to put in place an economic recovery program in 2009-2010. it was clear at that point that the u.k. needed a major rebalancing of our economy. the shift of spending away from consumption, private and public and toward the net exports whether exports or production to compete with imports. the st
are supposed to be a civilized society. we should be looking after the disabled citizens here in a u.k. -- of that u.k. will the prime minister listen to the thousands of people who signed the petition and finally, please, order an assessment of all changes for disabled people in this country? >> i will look very carefully. obviously it is a very tragic case that the gentleman brings to the house. everyone's thoughts will go out to that person's family and what has happened to them. what i would say to him is the actual money we are putting into disability benefits over the coming years is going up and not down, but i think everybody knows and everyone accepts that we need to have a review of disability benefits. some people have been stuck on these benefits and not been reviewed for year after year after year. that is the view of the disability charities and that of the government as well. >> thank you, mr. speaker. as we approach christmas, will the prime minister john me in celebrating the fact that there are more people in employment this christmas than there have ever been in this
questions on the immigration policy of the uk. this just over a half an hour. >> questions to the prime minister. >> this morning, i had meetings with ministerial colleagues. i will have further such meetings later today. >> mr. speaker, can my friend and confirm that the fall in unemployment figures is the largest since records began? will he meet with me to discuss how employment opportunities, including youth employment, can be promoted? >> i would be delighted to meet with my honorable friend to discuss the situation. he is absent -- he is absolutely right. the largest quarterly fall in a youth unemployment on record, 72,000 fewer people unemployed this quarter. obviously, there is no room for complacency. there are far too many people that are long-term unemployed. in these figures, we can see 40,000 more people in work. unemployment is down by 82,000. over 1 million extra private sector jobs under this government. >> mr. speaker, today's fall in unemployment and rise in employment is welcome. part of the challenge remains a stopping at the high level of long-term unemployment. doe
't seen that in the u.k. where the unemployment really hasn't reason as a result of such a deep downturn. >> is that the key factor given that we have had unrest in the past in bad economic times? do you think this time it's the unemployment figures that have made the difference? >> it clearly made a big difference because it shared the burden where whole industries would be wiped out or close to wiped out like the coal and steel industries in the 1980's. there was a focus for decent, a focus for protest. now it's more widely spread. someone in their street has lost their job. maybe a small closure but nothing like the massive closures we witnessed in the early 1980's. if things don't get better very slowly does that start to put a strain on democracy? is that why we've seen a rice in some of these extremist parties in europe? >> you have to be careful associating them directly with recession. the french national front was as strong and appeared in austerity when jacques chirac the leader of the nacional he was second in the french election. so the socialists were out even though it was
losses in the u.k. almost every year. >> if you've made losses in the suck which is what you're fighting, over 15 years, what has you doing business here? >> we know that we must within the u.k. to be a successful company. >> but you're not making money. >> we've had encouragement over times. >> 15 years. andre still making losses yet you're carrying on. if it's true. >> i assure you it's very strew. we're not at all there. >> i mean for 14 years of trading this -- in this country and get paid $17.6 million in corporation tax. you either want the business very badly or something else is going on. >> would you consider making a commit development the british marketplace about the degree to which you will have a fair approach to taxation? >> we are never aggressive in avoiding taxes by any means. we do not have tax havens in place. that's just now hot we do business. we look forward to deepening our investment. we have every intention to do that. >> your entire economic activity is here in the u.k. >> i do pay in pants. never comes out. your entire activity is here and yesterday you pay no
of that member. the u.k. has. and then the interest of scotland's economy. perhaps we'll see that fulfill into other arguments as wellle -- westminster review. >> there's anger other the churnl of england not to allow women bishops. and there's in problem over david cameron to aplow the propo sal. there's no electric mandate for these politics. after the owned of, he finally produce his report on media ethics. his inquiry was set up gld cakes of the hacking scandal. in his report he said parts of the media were wrengless and had weeked -- following that news conference david cameron came to the commons to end piece. >> i have proposals who have independent self-regulation organized by the media. he details the key requirement that an independent regular body should meet. a standards code. an arbitration service and a speaky complaint. usually it must have the pow fwore deband up front and impose up to a 1 lourks fine. >> i looks wlike it was -- that word "crucially" provide and i with quit independence process. this wood would reassure the basic requirements and the reeffective meets woff
in london. it is the uk equivalent of ashford in the u.s. i know that because the two cables down the east coast of africa both have their major london.n from there it is a straight shot. it is a fascinating place. it is in the same spot as the ancient report. -- port. this is the place where the international -- >> where are these undersea cables that you referred to earlier? and by whom? >> there have an telegraph cables across the atlantic for 150 years now. depending on how you count, individual strands or cable systems, there are about eight or 10 or 12 across the atlantic. the current generation was laid in the mid-90s. up until about 2002. they are owned by a few companies. very large backbone companies. they are owned by telecom, verizon, british telecom joining with deutsche telekom. or a couple are owned by companies that only own cables across the atlantic. they bought their people out of bankruptcy out of a larger telecom. -we specialize in new york or london. we will sell you services to another telecom or anyone who meets high-capacity bandwidth. >> what about this pacific? >
it now. uke messer,tative lo thank you for being on "newsmakers." let me turn to our reporters for a bit of a rapid conversation. he is the freshman president for public and, coming into the 113th congress. who are they? >> they are a very diverse bunch. there are some people who are new to politics. but a lot of them are long lines of luke messer, who have been in government at many levels. they're able to see a little bit more context than some of the fire breathing -- for lack of a better term. it will be interesting. it is not that much smaller of the freshman class, and there are fewer republicans, but they seem to be oriented toward public policy and any number of ways. >> is indicating he would support speaker boehner for the 130th congress. are they going to get along in this group -- 113th congress? are they going to get along in this group? >> there were a lot of problems during the debt negotiations. democrats had to step up and vote for the proposal to give it to pass. that is a fair question for this freshman class. are they going to support speaker boehner, or are they not?
is 2.4% more than the u.k. will the prime minister be gracious enough to congratulate iceland on working hard? >> if the case for an independent scotland is make us more like iceland, i am not sure i would -- that would totally recommend itself to the voters. i have a very good relations and i will make sure that remains the case. >> can i welcome the unemployment, where unemployment has fallen steadily, i urge the prime minister -- steadily. >> i am grateful for the point. we will continue for the use contract, and worked experience. what we are seeing is large numbers of people who go into work experience come off benefits, by a job, and find it is a good start to a career and a working career. that is what we want to see. i thank you. unemployment in scotland [indiscernible] is the prime minister as shocked as i am that some managers were encouraging employers to go into unpaid walk-in experience placements? will the prime minister condemn this practice immediately? >> an important point. we want work experience places to the additional places, encouraging more young people
countries are much farther along than we are. a still there, the netherlands, belgium, and the u.k. have achieved a measure of standardized regulatory reporting that allows them to consolidate reporting requirements, which saves money for the agencies and saves money for the companies that have to make the filings. that is the best example of what policy makers should be doing, focusing on open data innovations that will save money. >> the foia module was extremely cost effective to develop. it only costs $1 million or $2 million. i think that is an example of how innovation does not have to cost a lot of money. >> the gentleman in the front. i am dan in the huffington post. the experience of the transparency community has been much like other progressive groups, excited, high hopes for the obama administration. i wrote a piece called the wiki house and how the obama administration could open the windows. none of this happens. the goals were not, by any objective notion, reached. from the press secretary coming in on day one trying to fend questions rather than address them and help expl
is not serious. he is right. >> thank you. may i congratulate the prime minister and the u.k. government of following the lead of scottish government in introducing equal marriage, minimum pricing for alcohol, and, previously, on the smoking ban. will he follow in the lead of the scottish government? >> because of the measures taken, there is an extra 300 million pounds with the scottish government to spend. i am happy to say when good policies are introduced, i think we all have the opportunity to follow them. >> you have been watching the prime minister's questions. question time airs live on c- span2 every wednesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern when the house of commons is in session. again on sunday nights at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific on c- span. but any time ad c-span.org ord. -- watch any time at c-span.org on order. >> tomorrow, a discussion about the implementation of the e- government act. hosted by the information technology and innovation foundation. we will have that live at 9:00 a.m. eastern and c-span 3. -- on c-span 3. >> i think the challenge for us is that we want to see on
and real. again, you are competing with the u.k. parliament. they put their tax at 20%. there is no tax on repatriation. japan used to be the highest tax rate in the world, and we were second, and now, we are first. it is imperative from a competitive point of view. it is the absence of any decision that has got that trillions sitting on the sidelines waiting for some clarity about where we are going. long term fiscal responsibility. the handshake is there. the free market is in place. -- the framework is in place. we believe in these principles, and revenue is part of it. i would gladly give this up if i thought it was real long-term entitlement reform. >> just to be clear, you are talking about individual or corporate? >> from my perspective, i am part of that 2% that the people do not trust. but it is all about are we going to do the hard things? i would give it up in a minute. i would even give up the 42% if i knew it was going to the right thing. and it was long term comprehensive reform. i am just telling you. i would in a moment. and i do not think i am alone. i know the hearts o
a and officer training academy. members asked about the uk's immigration policy and concerns over proposed national health services spending cuts. >> questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. >> thank you. i am sure the whole house will wish to join me in sending our best wishes for christmas to our brave armed forces in afghanistan. it to their families who will be missing them, and to the servicemen and women around the world -- you are always in our thoughts. we owe you a deep debt of gratitude and sinew our heartfelt thanks at christmastime. i have meetings, and in addition to my duties i shall have further such meetings later today. >> thank you, mr. speaker. thanks my right honorable friend for comments about wishing a merry christmas to our service families under deployment -- service members under diplomat and their families. could my friend also tell me what progress has been made to remove the metals -- give the metals, especially those who served in arctic convoys, for their bravery? >> i thank my friend. on the issue of medals, which is gone on for a very lon
the uk's immigration policy. also proposed health services spending cuts. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. >>
long-term planning is about in a business context. you're competing with the u.k. parliament. the u.k. put their rate at 28% new york tax on repatriation. japan used to be the highest tax rate in the world and we were second, now we're first. it's imer -- imperative from a competitive point of view and as i alluded to it is the absence of any decision that's got that one-point-x trillion dollars sitting on the sideline. my own view is if you had the banner headline, long-term fiscal responsibility, handshake is there, the framework is in place, we believe in these principles and revenue will be part of it, i would gladly give up all the exemptions tomorrow in a minute if i thought it was real long-term planning. >> you talking individual or corporate? >> corporate but i'll do it individually to. i'm part of the 2% that the people that were here this morning don't trust. the point is, it's all about, are we going to do the hard things? i'd give it up in a minute. i'd give up the 4 % if i knew it was going toward the right thing. i'm tell yog uh that, i would in a minute. and i don't th
it came out almost two years ago. we said that the uk consolidation would fail. it had too much revenue. as we are seeing now, millionaires and billionaires are heading for the exit. that is what we are going to see. >> thank you. mr. chairman, i yield back. >> i would like to congratulate the chairman on his election and the fine work he has done as chairman of this committee and to congratulate mr. brady on being selected as his chair of this committee and the next congress. for our distinguished witnesses, they agreed that what we need to do is have a long- term solution. i would like to ask dr. zandi how we achieve that. we are several million dollars apart from the president's proposal. how would you close that gap? outline the president's proposal and speaker boehner's proposal. how can we get people employed and move our economy forward? >> i apologize. there will be a fair amount of numbers here. the president's tax revenue proposal amounts to about $1.6 trillion over a 10-year period. that is from higher tax rates. roughly 600 billion are from some kind of tax reform. they are
and will probably happen in europe. the u.k. specialized in being the home of trading. they certainly don't want that to be taxed. so yes, there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns, or at least it is in the running for number one. i have been to washington many times and am involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. >> let's give a round of applause for lynn. [applause] we have the opportunity for you to purchase and have the book signed. we thank you all for being here. if you have further questions, she will be here signing books, so come and talk to her. >> in the fall of 1774, the british admiral and generals and diplomats were reporting to the crown that the colonists for sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and so-called subversive acts. it is
when it came out almost two years ago. we said that the uk consolidation would fail. it had too much revenue. as we are seeing now, millionaires and billionaires are heading for the exit. that is what we are going to see. >> thank you. mr. chairman, i yield back. >> i would like to congratulate the chairman on his election and the fine work he has done as chairman of this committee and to congratulate mr. brady on being selected as his chair of this committee and the next congress. for our distinguished witnesses, they agreed that what we need to do is have a long-term solution. i would like to ask dr. zandi how we achieve that. we are several million dollars apart from the president's proposal. how would you close that gap? outline the president's proposal, speaker boehner rosie proposal -- speaker boehner's proposal. how can we get people employed and move our economy whoforward? >> i apologize. there will be a fair amount of numbers here. the president's tax revenue proposal amounts to about $1.6 trillion over eight 10 year -- a 10-year period. that is from higher tax rates. rough
would publish to is pulling your strings. the great problem with america, like in the u.k., is not so much the tax rate, but tax avoidance. the last point that i would like to make, 35 years, it led to the biggest crash since the 1930's. the reason why the state is in some much that is to be bailed out the banking system. maybe we should tackle that first before the flat rate tax system that does not work for people. guest: from our perspective, we vociferously opposed wall street. i thought that that was the very moment that public policy was straightened out in this company. 700 billion bailed out bad actors in this country? i am with you on that. we need to clean out capitalists. let's go after all of those special deals in the tax code. bankers and unions, all of the year marks have been put in their. that is what the tax code is all about. but if tax rates go too high, taxpayers will avoid them. tax rates matter. incentives matter. public policy in washington, d.c., changes the behavior of people. host: national links, this recent piece in roll-call says that freedom works as the
spending cuts, a proposed tax increase on middle income workers, the u.k. immigration policy, and renewable energy. that is tonight at 9:00 on c- span. >> the white house is very controversial. there was competition to design it. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly our- inspiring. -- awe-inspiring. the congressman said the building served its purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> she has gathered a few of her favorite white house photographs. watch tonight at 7:30 on c- span3's "american history tv." >> a senate finance subcommittee hearing looked at whether a tax incentives and energy policy will promote energy efficiency investment and economic growth. witnesses included representatives from the national energy laboratory. this is one hour and 20 minutes. ahead andn't we go get started? today's hearing considers some proposals to promote efficient use of energy resources. the tax code has long served as a way to promote energy policy goals. most of this time, the code only offered
at all? >> "24" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. it's beamed in illegally by -- you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stunningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that i like amer
heard anything at all? >> "24" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. --s beamed in illegally by you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stunningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that
and it has worked extremely well and australia and the uk. the political aspect would be huge. >> low-income students are risk averse. they do not have secret bank accounts where they can address the situation. and if they fail, the burdens of being on them. they are less likely to pursue a college education if it means earning more than their parents do in a year. we expect pell grant recipients to graduate with more debt than middle and upper income students. they are anywhere from 150% more likely to graduate. we are burdening those the least capable of the most that. the problem is that they are going to impact access. >> the point before you go on, a lot of that is about communicating to families what this means. it is far from perfect, but they are borrowing well beyond their families capability, baking on the fact that they will be able to. i don't disagree that there isn't a perfect model, but i think it has huge potential. >> i want to move on to questions from the audience because i want to get in as many as possible. i think what is interesting, so far, there seems to be a
and australia and the uk. the political aspect would be huge. >> low-income students are risk averse. they do not have secret bank accounts where they can address the situation. and if they fail, the burdens of being on them. they are less likely to pursue a college education if it means earning more than their parents do in a year. we expect pell grant recipients to graduate with more debt than middle and upper income students. they are anywhere from 150% more likely to graduate. we are burdening those the least capable of the most that. the problem is that they are going to impact access. >> the point before you go on, a lot of that is about communicating to families what this means. it is far from perfect, but they are borrowing well beyond their families capability, baking on the fact that they will be able to. theret disagree that isn't a perfect model, but i think it has huge potential. >> i want to move on to questions from the audience because i want to get in as many as possible. i think what is interesting, so far, there seems to be a lot of changes that would take political will th
, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> all this month we have been talking with retirin
and repayment would be income base of. their problems with the model that needs to be worked out. in the u.k. needs to unveil this model. students or a concerned about the potential outcome. as the thought through and worked to it. it is an equitable model. the problem with doing anything up front as we did not know what they're earning potential will be until they are actually earning. any model we put up in place, there will be adjustments made. i really think making it all loan based and having loans repaid the base daunting come and the set of rules that would keep people from gaming the system based on their incomes as a better model than trying to plug the holes to increase pell or not. it addresses the up front issues with students who are really the first time it will to assess whether the are prepared to do college level work. this secure the loan debt. if we base on their income, if that is done influence their income, there are off the hook. the model and the funding has to work. i am not an economist. of a buffet and the out with you now. in terms of ideas that i see as games cha
. with that kind of help. the u.k. has supported us very much. we have been recently asking canada to support us on some of our structural reforms. in my case, right now, military reforms. it is getting a kind of support that is allowing us to get into these different levels. not all cases are equal, but it depends on what you find. for most, the idea of intervention and, i think it is better thinking about cooperation, even with the difficult partners. >> i really would like to get to the audience now. we have a fabulous panel. >> thank you so much. i'm from the united states. thank you, mr. mackay for your hospitality this year. this is a brilliant events. i have to say thank you to senator mccain for your service to our country and your calendar, as usual. -- your candor. the title -- of the really are the good guys -- have the special burden. for the first time have been convened in halifax, canada is in the chair of the arctic council. after canada's chairmanship it will be the united states. there are only eight nations making up the arctic council, but the whole world is interested. china
in the subset than in australia and the u.k., they tend to be only about 10 to 15%. money comes from the private sector in terms of equity, that is. and it really is because the cost of capital for that equity is definitely based on precedent deals north of 10% cost of capital. so for projects like this they would start with grant money first, then maybe any potential subsidized or low cost loans, and then eventually figure out how much more additional capital would be needed and dowled private sector come up with that amount. and given the size of the total project, i think we haven't had the ability to say if that's -- if there is enough capital to do that but in segments and given general interest in rail, i believe if structured appropriately there should be a way to do this. >> but you say 10 to 15% of the total project cost would come from private capital. >> that's right. >> where would the rest come from? >> if you look at some of the examples like the toll roads built in florida a lot of it comes from federal or state funds. it's not to say these are grants but a lot of times they are p
they weren't replaced at all so you didn't end one that productivty benefits. this was also the case in the u.k. where they've seen that sort of dwerjens so when you look at the difference between productivty of the public and preist sector, it's technology. private sector has been able to harvest the productivty benefits of technology to take cost out and take it out in a pretty radical way. and that just hasn't happened here. i hold a little bit more hope for mobile in this regard which i think mobile has an opportunity to be more trance formative because people will interact more with government and we've goten smarter about that sort of thing. but we have to start closing down systems which i don't think happened to tay great extent. >> i'll just give you my experience of an account executive before i came to congress as well. agencies focus on their buments and it is the nature of man that people do not like to -- you get your savings and you don't get the benefit of those savings, they go to somebody who isn't doing the same kind of thing. so the nature of government makes this difficult
. that is what we have to worry about because we already see this happening. we also see in the u.k. that there are people being arrested. .t may be nasty stuff turning around, after the levison inquiry, regulating media. where is speech? this is a dangerous stance we are about to go under here. there is a fight over the effort to make google pay for the link.. if you can do that for media, maybe you can do it for bloggers like me. there is danger there. in dubai, they refused to have a favor of having the right on line. instead, they ordered the introduction of a firmly worded press release. speech is in danger this year. facebook is a place where we can share and can act. it is going wrong -- a round. i urge you to recognize that we must not only get enamored with new tools and toys. we have an obligation to protect the freedom. share and can act. we must protect the net. [applause] >> the phrase rock star is thrown around a lot. i am happy to welcome a bonafide rock star, amanda plummer is best known as one half of the dresden dolls. she started releasing solo albums produced by
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)

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